Space Going For NFPA Exec Program

By Mike Brezonick05 December 2019

The National Fluid Power Association announced that limited space is still available in the 2020/21 cohort of the NFPA Executive Leadership Program, presented in collaboration with the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

Registration for this cohort will close Dec. 31, 2019 or when full. The series of six full-day education sessions conducted over the course of 18 months is designed to provide a fluid power industry specific experience that accelerates leadership and fosters long-term connections. Session content will focus on both the hard and soft skills needed to create success for participants’organizations and the fluid power industry as a whole.

Those interested in applying must be employed at an NFPA member company to participate. The cohort size is capped at 24 participants, and a wait list will be available for additional interested companies. The program registration cost is $15,000. This amount can be paid all at once or split into two payments of $7,500.

Those interested in participating can learn more and register at NFPA.com. Inquiries can be directed to Katrina Schwarz at kschwarz@nfpa.com.

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