RhinoAg To Build Dixie Chopper Mowers

By Chad Elmore29 August 2019

Alamo Group company RhinoAg has announced that it will soon begin production of Dixie Chopper mowers. Alamo purchased Dixie Chopper in July, citing its strong brand equity and innovation in the zero-turn mowing market.

“We can’t wait to get started,” said Dan Samet, president of RhinoAg. “Right now, we’re in the process of ordering parts and retooling the facility to start making Dixie Chopper mowers.”

RhinoAg said it plans to begin production of some of the most popular Dixie Chopper models — such as XCaliber and Classic (shown) mowers — as quickly as possible at its Gibson City, Ill., factory.

“Our goal is to have Dixie Choppers available for our dealers in time for the 2020 mowing season,” said Samet. “We are working with our suppliers to expedite the components required to build Dixie Chopper products while we ensure our factory is ready to get started as soon as those components get to us.”

Since patenting a four-gearbox flex-wing rotary cutter in 1969, RhinoAg has made rotary and flail mowers and cutters, rear blades, post hole diggers, tillers and box blades sold throughout the world.

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